Feminist Allies

Intersectional feminism with men in mind.

Anonymous asked: Please don't make Coulson gay because you can. He was created straight and written straight in Battle Scars.

aleskot:

Look, no-one said I was or wasn’t writing Coulson in Secret Avengers as gay. One beautiful thing about fiction is that we fill it with our own meanings. For example: was Coulson really created and written straight, instead of, let’s say, bisexual? How do you even do that unless you explicitly identify him as straight and choose to believe the character is telling the truth? You see my point? In case you don’t: fiction is infinitely malleable. There is no certainty, and there is no certainty in the universe, except perhaps change. 

I sense a certain dose of entitlement in your request — which, by the way, says a lot about you and nothing about the fiction you consume. I don’t react to entitlement well, but I am transforming my initial reaction into something positive here, and perhaps you’ll use that as a guiding light for yourself, too. Perhaps the question you want to ask yourself is, “Why am I so hung up on my perception of a fictional character’s theoretically heterosexual identity, and does me being hung up on it have anything to do with my possible uncertainty regarding my own sexual identity?”

It might. It might not. U-decide.

The Great Wall of Vagina - Jamie McCartney (x)

Jamie made molds of the vaginas of women between 18 and 76 years. Among others, they include twins and transgender women. Women are often confused about their vagina, because they think it looks different: with this project he demonstrates that vaginas are as different as faces. McCartney hopes that his work will help to stop the increasing growth of labia corrections in recent years.

(Source: rikkisixx, via ahlesfemmes)

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

(via feministbatwoman)

elodieunderglass:

nltm:

megaklefki:

giantbomblr:

nltm:

hall of fame

In case anyone wanted some new games writers to follow, someone was kind enough to make this handy-dandy guide!

Do any of them have Tumblrs?

Jeff Gerstmann, Brad Shoemaker, Patrick Klepek, and Alex Navarro do. Dunno about the rest. You should probably follow Zoe Quinn too, considering how this all started.

John Walker is good people, though I’m biased because I love his wife too much and miss her too hard. 

(via feministbatwoman)

Dear Gentlemen of Comics...Can We Talk?

tessfowler:

Laying my sword down for a second. You’re safe here. I’m not going to hack you to pieces. For the moment, at least. (See? That’s a joke. I’m normal just like you. I make jokes too.) But I warn you, this is probably not something you want to hear. Don’t be scared though….